Help Mrs Joyce find out about Qatar before her trip to the iEARN Conference

Mrs Joyce is heading to Qatar for the iEARN conference.

5/6J spent some time today discussing Mrs Joyce’s trip to Qatar. Mrs Joyce is excited and nervous because she is excited to be meeting teachers from all over the world, she is nervous because she will fly all by herself for 17 hours to get to Qatar.

Can you 5/6J and anyone connected to our Blog, help Mrs Joyce to find out about Qatar? What food can Mrs Joyce eat there? What clothes should she wear? What will the weather be like? What famous landmarks could she visit?

Watch out 5/6J, last year when Mrs Joyce visited China she came back with so many new ideas for the classroom, imagine what she will be like when she spends a week with expert teachers from all over the world.

Check out these images:

qatar1 qatar2

  One thought on “Help Mrs Joyce find out about Qatar before her trip to the iEARN Conference

  1. Ben
    April 18, 2013 at 10:03 pm

    Qatar
    Qatar is a country in the Middle East. Its official name is the State of Qatar. There are about 300,000 people. They
    are a very rich country. They have many reserves of oil and natural gas.
    Geography
    Qatar is a peninsula (a strip of land sticking out into the sea). It is joined to Saudi Arabia to the south, and all the
    other sides of it are surrounded by the waters of the Arabian Gulf.
    Qatar is quite a small country and has an area of only 10,360 km². The peninsula is 160 km long. Much of the
    country is a low, barren plain, covered with sand. The Jebel Dukhan area has Qatar’s main onshore oil deposits. The
    natural gas fields lie offshore, to the northwest of the peninsula.
    The capital of Qatar is Doha. Over 90% of the people live in Doha. The other large city is Al Wakrah.
    Government and politics
    Qatar has an unelected, monarchic, emirate-type government. The position of emir is hereditary.
    The Emir is the only one who can appoint and remove the prime minister and cabinet ministers. Together the
    ministers make up the Council of Ministers. Theyn are the hightest executive authority in the country.
    People and culture
    People from Qatar are called Qataris. They are Arabs. The official language of Qatar is Arabic, but many people
    also speak English, especially when they are doing business.
    About 885,000 people live in Qatar; however, about 80% of these are guest workers (people from another country
    who are living and working there for a short time).
    Nearly all of Qatar’s economy comes from producing petroleum and natural gas.
    The currency of Qatar is called the Qatari Riyal.
    Almost all Qataris follow the religion of Islam. However, many of the guest workers follow other religions.
    Sport
    Football is the most popular sport in Qatar, closely followed by cricket. The Qatar under-20 national football team
    finished second in the 1981 FIFA World Youth Championship.
    The Asian Football Confederation’s 2011 AFC Asian Cup finals were held in Qatar in January 2011. It was the
    second time it has been hosted by Qatar, the other being the 1988 AFC Asian Cup.
    Doha, Qatar, is also home to Qatar Racing Club a Drag Racing facility.
    Khalifa International Tennis and Squash Complex in Doha, Qatar, hosted the WTA Tour Championships in women’s
    tennis between 2008 and 2010. Doha holds the WTA Premier tournament Qatar Ladies Open each year.
    On 2 December 2010, Qatar won their bid to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup.[5]
    Nasser Al-Attiyah of Qatar won the 2011 Dakar Rally and the Production World Rally Championship in 2006. In
    addition, he has also won gold medals at the 2002 Asian Games and 2010 Asian Games as part of the Qatari skeet
    shooting team.
    Since 2002, Qatar has hosted the yearly Tour of Qatar, a cycling race in six stages. Every February, riders are racing
    on the roads across Qatar’s flat land for six days. Each stage covers a distance of more than 100 km.

  2. Jake
    April 18, 2013 at 11:35 pm

    Geography
    Qatar (pronounced KAH-ter) occupies a small peninsula that extends into the Persian Gulf from the east side of the Arabian Peninsula. Saudi Arabia is to the west and the United Arab Emirates to the south. The country is mainly barren.

    Government
    Constitutional monarchy.

    History
    Qatar was once controlled by the sheikhs of Bahrain, but in 1867, war broke out between the people and their absentee rulers. To keep the peace in the Persian Gulf, the British installed Muhammad ibn Thani al-Thani, head of a leading Qatari family, as the region’s ruler. In 1893, the Ottoman Turks made incursions into Qatar, but the emir successfully deflected them. In 1916, the emir agreed to allow Qatar to become a British protectorate.

    Oil was discovered in the 1940s, bringing wealth to the country in the 1950s and 1960s. About 85% of Qatar’s income from exports comes from oil. Its people have one of the highest per capita incomes in the world. In 1971, Qatar was to join the other emirates of the Trucial Coast to become part of the United Arab Emirates. But both Qatar and Bahrain decided against the merger and instead formed independent nations.

    Qatar permitted the international forces to use Qatar as a base during the 1991 Persian Gulf War. A border dispute erupted with Saudi Arabia that was settled in Dec. 1992. A territorial dispute with Bahrain over the Hawar Islands remains unresolved, however. In 1994, Qatar signed a defense pact with the U.S., becoming the third Gulf state to do so.

    In June 1995, Crown Prince Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani deposed his father, primarily because the king was out of step with the country’s economic reforms. The emir was not stripped of his title, and much of the power was already in his son’s hands. The new emir lifted press censorship and instituted other liberal reforms, including democratic elections and women’s suffrage (1999). In 2003 Crown Prince Jassim, who declared he had never wanted to be king, abdicated in favor of his younger brother, Prince Tamim.

    Qatar is the home of Al Jazeera, the immensely popular and controversial Arabic satellite television network.

    Qatar introduced its first constitution on June 9, 2005. It guarantees freedom of expression, assembly, and religion and calls for a 45-seat parliament. Thirty of the seats will be filled in democratic elections; the emir will appoint the remaining seats.

    Sheik Abdullah bin Khalifa Al Thani resigned as prime minister in April 2007. The emir named former foreign minister Sheik Hamad bin Jassem al Thani as his replacement.

  3. Jake
    April 18, 2013 at 11:41 pm

    A lot of goats and rice pronounced ruz. Fava and chickpeas are staples. Some eat lambs for meat too.

  4. Mason
    April 18, 2013 at 11:42 pm

    Traditionally, Qatari people ate lightly in the morning and evening and had their main meal in the middle of the day. This habit is changing with many families having their main meal in the evening. For many people, the Friday midday meal following prayers is the week’s main family gathering. During the holy month of Ramadan, Muslims fast between dawn and dusk. Elaborate, festive meals are served after nightfall. Eating and drinking in public during daylight hours in Ramadan is prohibited for all, whether fasting or not.

  5. Ben
    April 18, 2013 at 11:43 pm

    Food Mrs Joyce will have to eat 🙁
    http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&safe=active&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1024&bih=368&q=qatar+food&oq=qatar+food&gs_l=img.3..0l3j0i24l7.2917.15675.0.16455.10.10.0.0.0.0.483.2589.2-1j4j2.7.0…0.0…1ac.1.9.img.K2IzKl8NbCw

  6. Ashlee
    April 18, 2013 at 11:46 pm

    http://www.doha-delivery.com/restaurant/menu/McDonald's/16 I think there is a McDonalds delivery.

  7. Jayden
    April 18, 2013 at 11:46 pm

    Men and women should dress modestly as a courtesy to both Qataris and Muslims. Swimsuits and beachwear is acceptable at the hotel beaches (don’t forget sunscreen), but it is not appropriate to expose the body in other public areas. Topless sunbathing is definitely taboo. Tops should cover the shoulders and upper arms, and skirts or shorts should fall to or below the knee. Women are not obliged to cover their hair. Visitors should be thoughtful of their clothing particularly in the Holy Month of Ramadan, or when in traditional public areas.

  8. Mason
    April 18, 2013 at 11:48 pm

    Many people in Qatar don’t use knives and forks when eating traditional food, preferring to use their right hand – the left hand should not be used for eating, or indeed for shaking hand, as it is reserved for more demeaning tasks. Of course, the hand should be clean and the nails cut short. Polite Qataris will only use three, or perhaps four, of their fingers to pick up the food. Alternatively, they may use bread to scoop up the food.

  9. Jayden
    April 18, 2013 at 11:48 pm
  10. Ben
    April 18, 2013 at 11:49 pm

    Natural Landmarks in Qatar

    With the sun shining every day and a surprisingly rich ecology, Qatar offers an engaging natural environment to explore. The surrounding desert provides a great deal of interest and adventure with such natural landmarks as the Dhal Al Misfir, Desert Roses and the Singing Sand Dunes.

    Dhal Al Misfir
    Dhal Al Misfir is a 40 meter deep cave formation located north of the Salwa Road, with fiberous gypsum crystal.

    Desert Roses
    The low salt flats near Al Shahaniya and north of the Saudi border are collecting grounds for those willing to dig for the attractive gypsum formations known as ‘desert roses’.

    The Singing Sand Dunes (40 km southwest of Doha)
    There are certain conditions in which the movement of sand grains can create a low murmur or ‘singing’ – a phenomenon often reported by desert explorers. Qatar is fortunate in having sand with the right abrasive qualities in an area that also experiences the necessary wind and moisture conditions to create this wonderful if weird effect. While the ‘singing’ occurs naturally, it can be triggered by sliding down the face of the dune or running along its crest, whereupon each footstep creates a humming that cannot only be heard but also felt as a vibration through the feet.
    Natural LandmarksWith the sun shining every day and a surprisingly rich ecology, Qatar offers an engaging natural environment to explore. The surrounding desert provides a great deal of interest and adventure with such natural landmarks as the Dhal Al Misfir, Desert Roses and the Singing Sand Dunes.
    Dhal Al Misfir
    Dhal Al Misfir is a 40 meter deep cave formation located north of the Salwa Road, with fiberous gypsum crystal.
    Desert RosesThe low salt flats near Al Shahaniya and north of the Saudi border are collecting grounds for those willing to dig for the attractive gypsum formations known as ‘desert roses’. The Singing Sand Dunes (40 km southwest of Doha)There are certain conditions in which the movement of sand grains can create a low murmur or ‘singing’ – a phenomenon often reported by desert explorers. Qatar is fortunate in having sand with the right abrasive qualities in an area that also experiences the necessary wind and moisture conditions to create this wonderful if weird effect. While the ‘singing’ occurs naturally, it can be triggered by sliding down the face of the dune or running along its crest, whereupon each footstep creates a humming that cannot only be heard but also felt as a vibration through the feet.

  11. Rennae
    April 18, 2013 at 11:51 pm

    Arabic Dishes, Rules and Etiquette
    Qataris pride themselves on their hospitality, and food and drink is an important part of this. When visiting houses, accept at least some of the pro-offered and drink, even if it is extremely sweet: if you refuse hospitality you may offend your hosts.

    Many people in Qatar don’t use knives and forks when eating traditional food, preferring to use their right hand – the left hand should not be used for eating, or indeed for shaking hand, as it is reserved for more demeaning tasks. Of course, the hand should be clean and the nails cut short. Polite Qataris will only use three, or perhaps four, of their fingers to pick up the food. Alternatively, they may use bread to scoop up the food.

    When speaking to Qataris about their food, it is quickly obvious that they have a sweet tooth. Many of the dishes they eat use sugar, and many Qataris believe in consuming a spoonful of honey morning and night. Dates are a very important food, and can be consumed at any time of the day. A visitor should always be offered dates, and if you have any dealings with Qataris you probably will be.

    Temperature
    The month of July is characterized by essentially constant daily high temperatures, with daily highs around 41°C throughout the month, exceeding 44°C or dropping below 37°C only one day in ten.

    The SouqDoha’s Souq Waqif — located a short distance from the city’s waterfront promenade, the Corniche — is one of its most-visited landmarks. This winding maze of shops and restaurants is about a century old, but early this century, the country’s leaders renovated it to resemble the souqs of ancient Arabic times. Visitors can walk the narrow streets, sample Qatari delicacies, browse crafts and try a water pipe. The souq is open in the morning, but most businesses shut down in the afternoon. Activity begins to pick up again in late afternoon and into the evening.

    Museum of Islamic ArtOpened in 2008, Doha’s Museum of Islamic Art (mia.org.qa) quickly became one of the city’s top architectural landmarks. The building, designed by architectural master I.M. Pei, sits on its own man-made island near the Corniche, allowing it to stand apart from the rest of the city’s development. The museum is stunning both outside and in: a minimalistic cubic design for its exterior and a grand atrium that appears differently depending on where you stand inside. The collections inside also are quite extensive, detailing 15 centuries of Islamic culture through art, jewelry and crafts.

  12. Mason
    April 18, 2013 at 11:55 pm

    ——————————————————————————–

    The importance of these dates can not be over-emphasized. This abundant fruit can be eaten at any time of day, and is served to guests as a mark of hospitality. Even today, business is often conducted only after dates have been offered. Despite it sweetness, the date is full of vitamins and a good source of energy. Dates are considered especially important during Ramadan, and will be eaten at the breaking of the fast. Rice is also considered a staple food, and in olden days was brought into Qatar by trading caravans.

    Seafood has always been incredibly abundant: so much so that at times large quantities of fish were shipped abroad for use as fertilizer. Seafood obviously played a huge role in the subsistence of the Qatari family. However, it was so cheap and available that families were often embarrassed to serve it if they had guests. A fabulous array of fresh seafood can still be see on display at Doha’s Wholesale Markets

  13. Ben
    April 18, 2013 at 11:56 pm

    Transport in Qatar
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transport_in_Qatar

  14. Jake
    April 19, 2013 at 12:03 am

    Actually, yo can’t dress that you want. It’s not a law to dress like muslim woman, but you must use “modest” dress, and cover your legs and shoulders.

  15. natashae
    April 19, 2013 at 12:04 am
  16. Ben
    April 19, 2013 at 12:08 am

    Alcohol Laws
    Qatar is an Islamic country. Care should be taken to behave in a manner that does not offend the country’s culture or religious beliefs, particularly during Ramadan. Alcohol is not illegal in Qatar, but the following laws apply to alcohol and its consumption:

    •It is illegal to import alcohol into the country. All luggage is scanned at the arrivals hall of Doha airport
    •It is an offence to drink alcohol or to be drunk in a public place. People breaking this law can be deported, fined or receive prison sentences. Muslims caught drinking may be subjected to corporal punishment
    •Alcohol should not be transported within the country, except to take it home from the warehouse on the day of collection
    •It is an offence to offer alcohol to Muslims and minors
    •It is illegal to sell, donate or give away alcohol
    Buying and Drinking Alcohol
    Expatriates living in Qatar can buy alcohol via a permit system. It is also available in licenced restaurants and hotels which may sell alcohol to adult, non-Muslim customers in restricted areas.

    The Qatar Distribution Company is the sole importer and retailer of alcohol in the country. They run two shops which are the only places where alcohol can be purchased. They offer a wide range of beverages and a permit is needed to make a purchase. Any alcohol bought must be hidden from view and taken straight home. The amount of alcohol that a person can purchase each month depends on their salary.

    •Qatar Distribution Company
    At: Nr Qatar Technical College, Street 668, Al Maamoura, Doha
    Tel: 4469 9412
    Applying for an Alcohol Permit
    Alcohol permits are administered by the Qatar Distribution Company and application forms can be obtained at their shop. A permit must be shown to enter the shop. A letter, written in English, is needed to apply for an alcohol permit. If the letter is written in Arabic it is usually accepted if it is accompanied by a stamped translation. The letter must be addressed to the Qatar Distribution Company, be stamped and signed by an authorised person within the company, and include the following information:

    •The applicant’s position within their company
    •The applicant’s basic salary. The word ‘basic’ must be used. To get a permit a minimum salary is needed (4,000 riyals or 1,100 US dollars)
    •Whether the applicant receives an accommodation entitlement or has free accommodation
    •Whether the applicant is married
    •When applying for a permit an individual must fill in an application form, pay a returnable deposit and state their religion
    The following additional documents are also required:

    •A passport, or equivalent identification (a photocopy is acceptable)
    •A residence permit (a photocopy is acceptable)
    Drink Driving
    Qatar has a zero tolerance attitude to driving under the influence of alcohol. Drink driving offenders are punished by custodial sentences ranging from one month to three years, a fine or both. Those caught drink driving may also be deported. People should be aware that it if a police file is opened against them for a drinking or driving related offence, then they are not allowed to leave the country until the case has been resolved. Most cases are straightforward, but more serious offences can take six months to go to court.

  17. Rennae
    April 19, 2013 at 12:09 am

    Shopping in Doha is nearly a tourist experience in itself. Whether seeking Western wares or specialty foods, there are ample outlets of souvenirs as well as outposts of Americana for the homesick.

    The City Center Mall opened its doors in May 2001; it contains many native Qatari shops, dozens upon dozens of familiar retail, and Starbuckses around several corners. Be warned though that Fridays is Family day; singles are not allowed entry.

    Another quality shopping center in the capital is the Hyatt Mall, a one-floor one-stop spot for groceries, baked goods, meats, electronics, and other practical items. There are also jewelry stores here, along with a food court.

    The latest addition to modern shopping malls is Villaggio, located across the road from Hyatt Mall; the italian themed malls has a great portfolio of international names in fashion as well as a food court, cinema, an ice-skating ring and actual canal & gondola!

    The best places to shop, however, are the local souq markets, one of the most notable being the Souq Waqif, where one can haggle over traditional wares in a traditional environment. Grab your jewellery here, your handicrafts, fabrics and spices. Shops open later in the day, so get to business in the bazaars in the late afternoon or early evening. Take a break in one of the cafes on the main road, some have external air conditioning.

    Souvenir items can be found much cheaper at the City Center than at the Souk. Upon shopping at both many times the same souvenirs are double the price at the Wakif Souk. The Souk is worth the visit in the evening to sit and smoke shisha at an outside café and do some people watching.

  18. Bailey B 5/6s
    April 19, 2013 at 12:12 am
  19. Rennae
    April 19, 2013 at 12:13 am

    Cinemas
    Gulf Cinema/ Doha Cinema
    Location: By the junction between C Ring Road and Al Sadd Street
    Tel: +974 4467 1811

    The Grand Cinecenter
    Location: near the food court at the City Center
    Tel:+974 44839064

    Cinema Palace
    Location: Top floor Royal Plaza, on Al Sadd Street close to HSBC.
    Tel: +974 4320938

    Cineplex
    Location: Villagio, Al Wabb Street, near the Virgin Megastore.

    The Mall Cineplex
    Location: The Mall, D Ring Road, close to the airport.
    Contact: +974 4467 8666.

    Cinema Land
    Location: Landmark Shopping Mall on Al Shamal Road.
    Contact: +974 4488 1674

    Mir Cinema
    Tel: (00974) 44424913

    Villagio Cinema
    Location: opposite Virgin in Villagio on Al Wabb Road
    Contact: +974 7794-1252

    The Mall Shopping Complex
    Tel: 00974 44678888

    Centrepoint Al Asmakh Mall
    Tel: 00974 44289141

    City Center Shopping Mall
    Tel: 00974 44839990

    Doha Players
    Tel: 00974 44871196

    Landmark Cinema
    Tel: 00974 44881674

  20. natashae
    April 19, 2013 at 12:14 am

    The national flag is maroon
    with a broad, vertical, white
    stripe at the pole; the two
    colours are separated by
    a nine-point serrated line.
    According to 1931 archives, the white colour
    reflects the internationally recognised symbol of
    peace; the maroon symbolises the blood shed
    during the battles Qatar fought, particularly
    in the second half of the 19th century; and the
    nine-point serration indicates that Qatar was
    the ninth member of the ‘reconciled Emirates’
    following the conclusion of the Qatari-British
    treaty in 1916.

  21. Ben
    April 19, 2013 at 12:15 am

    Entertament
    http://www.fivepointqatar.com/

  22. Terry
    April 19, 2013 at 12:15 am

    Coffee is extremely important in Qatari culture. Arabian coffee is of a very high quality and made from a lightly roasted bean spiced with cardamom and either sweetened or served with dates. It is drunk in small, thimble-like cups in homes and offices.

  23. Jayden
    April 19, 2013 at 12:16 am

    Chairman’s MessageVision & StrategyOrganizational ChartCareers GeographyHistoryPolitical StructureEconomy Press ReleasesEventsThe World Speaks About QatarVideosPhoto GalleryArchives Travel EssentialsGetting aroundTour OperatorsWhere to stayWhere to EatUseful Links Please fill out this form to receive QTA updates This is a required field Please enter a valid email
    Contact UsUseful Documents Travel Essentials
    Getting around
    Tour Operators
    Where to stay
    Where to Eat
    Useful Links
    CustomsAlcohol
    Qatar has a relatively liberal attitude to the consumption of alcohol by non-Muslims, and liquor is available in most hotels (in rooms, restaurants and bars). However, it is strictly forbidden to bring any alcohol into the country, including duty free, and the sale of alcohol is prohibited in Ramadan in all hotels. There are stiff penalties for consuming alcohol other than on licensed premises or in homes covered by liquor permit. Drunk-driving is a serious offence in Qatar and will not be tolerated.

    The effects of alcohol can be exacerbated by the heat and humidity of the local climate. To avoid dehydration, be sure to drink plenty of water, especially in the hotter summer months.

    Bargaining
    Good-natured bargaining is a way of life in the Middle East, and it can be quite enjoyable if you have the patience to see it through; try, and you’ll see that vendors enjoy the banter that the whole process involves.
    When visiting souqs, you are generally not expected to pay the initial asking price.
    However, bargaining does not apply to all retailshops in Qatar, as many as of the more modern shops, especially food outlets, have firm prices.
    Generally, the more you buy, the better the discount you are likely to get.

    Clothing
    Men and women should dress modestly as a courtesy to both Qataris and Muslims. Swimsuits and beachwear is acceptable at the hotel beaches (don’t forget sunscreen), but it is not appropriate to expose the body in other public areas. Topless sunbathing is definitely taboo. Tops should cover the shoulders and upper arms, and skirts or shorts should fall to or below the knee. Women are not obliged to cover their hair. Visitors should be thoughtful of their clothing particularly in the Holy Month of Ramadan, or when in traditional public areas.

    The extreme heat and high humidity of summertime means lightweight fibres are advisable (clothes made from ‘wicking’ – high techpolyester – material are invaluable); covering up susceptible parts of your body whilst outside they will also prevent sunburn. However a jumper or wrap may be needed inside malls, cinemas and restaurants, as the air conditioning can be fierce. Wintertime can be chilly, especially in the evenings, and there is also a chance of rain, so coats and closed shoes will be useful.

    Language
    Arabic is the official and main language, but English is widely spoken in every part of the country.
    Despite the fact that most Qatari people speak fluently English, they feel honored to see their guests speaking a few words in Arabic:
    Hello (welcome) – marhaba
    Hello (peace be upon you) – assalamo alaykum
    Good morning – sabah al khair
    Good afternoon/evening – misaa al khair
    Goodbye – ma’salaama
    How are you? – kaif halaak (m) / kaif haalik (f )
    Please – min fadlak
    Thank you – shukran
    Not at all – afwan
    Yes – na’am
    No – la
    I want a taxi – ureed taxi
    Right – yameen
    Left – yasar
    Straight ahead – alatool
    Let’s go – yalla
    Finished – khallas
    No problem – ma fi mushkila
    This/that – hatha / hathaak
    I want to buy…/I’d like – areed ashtiri…/ ana areed
    The bill please – fatoura, laow samaht
    Yesterday/today/ tomorrow – ams / alayum/bukra
    God willing – insha’Allah

  24. natashae
    April 19, 2013 at 12:18 am

    Qatar offers the visitor many wonderful
    photographic opportunities, but permission
    should always be sought before including any
    locals in those pictures. Ladies, in particular,
    can take offence if they believe their photograph
    has been taken and may even go so far as to
    seek police intervention. Military sites and
    certain government facilities display ‘No
    Photography’ notices.

  25. Terry
    April 19, 2013 at 12:18 am

    Hummus, a dip made from chickpeas and tahini, a sesame seed paste.

  26. Ben
    April 19, 2013 at 12:18 am

    Doha Convention Centre
    http://maps.google.com.au/maps?hl=en&tab=wl

  27. Terry
    April 19, 2013 at 12:22 am

    Breakfast is usually a light meal, which is eaten early and includes yogurt, cheese and olives eaten with coffee. A main midday meal is usually heavy, beginning with an appetiser, or mezze, served with flat Arabic bread followed by a stew of lamb or fish with cooked vegetables and salad. Many people do not use cutlery and scoop their food using bread. The evening meal is typically a light snack, except during Ramadan and on special occasions.

  28. natashae
    April 19, 2013 at 12:24 am

    This Guide includes a number of useful maps.
    However, for those who need more detailed
    maps, the government’s Geographic Information
    Systems has an excellent website with maps
    of the entire country. You can zoom in on any
    district of Doha and search for a specific street.

  29. Mason
    April 19, 2013 at 12:26 am

    This small market, near the Thursday/Friday Market, offers a curious mishmash of items, such as Saudi dates and hand-woven baskets, Omani dried fish, tobacco and lemons, Iranian honey and pots, camel sticks and incense, and fronds of pollen-baring date flowers (to fertilise the female date palms). Buying anything here renders the satisfaction of taking part in a trade that has existed between Oman and the Gulf for centuries

  30. Terry
    April 19, 2013 at 12:29 am

    alcohole is not ilaglle in quatar, but the following laws apply to alcohol and its consumption.

  31. natashae
    April 19, 2013 at 12:36 am

    The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Agriculture,
    in cooperation with environmental agencies
    and organisations, runs an annual ‘clean and
    green’ campaign. Although areas of arable land
    are limited, Qatar has a number of small farms
    producing cereal crops, fruit and vegetables.
    Examples of the desert fauna can be seen in
    Doha Zoo. They include scorpions, long-legged
    hedgehogs, snakes, fennec foxes, desert wolves,
    hares, and much more. Protected turtle-nesting
    beaches are maintained within Ras Laffan
    Industrial City, which also has programmes to

  32. Jake
    April 19, 2013 at 12:36 am

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    CategoriesArchery
    Asian Games
    Athletes
    Athletic Coaches and Managers
    Badminton
    Baseball
    Basketball
    Bowling
    Boxing
    Cheerleading
    Commonwealth Games
    Cricket (Sport)
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    Curling
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    Equestrian Sports
    Extreme Sports
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    » More Answers.com > Wiki Answers > Categories > Sports > What sports do they play in Qatar?
    What sports do they play in Qatar?
    In: Sports [Edit categories]
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  33. natashae
    April 19, 2013 at 12:40 am

    Qatar’s culture and traditions stem from its
    religious heritage and dual seafaring and
    nomadic Bedouin communities. Until the late
    1930s, the economy was based on the harvesting
    and sale of natural Gulf pearls. Combined with
    a strong oral tradition, this has resulted in many
    stories, poems, songs and dances related to the
    desert and the sea.
    The National Council for Culture, Heritage and
    Art and the Museums Committee oversee the
    preservation and development of the country’s
    rich traditions, crafts and collections. A new
    Cultural Village is being built in the West Bay
    Lagoon area of Doha and will include craft
    displays and sales, exhibition galleries and a
    conference facility. Spectacular new museums
    of Islamic arts, photography and natural history
    will open within the next couple of years with

  34. Carissa
    April 19, 2013 at 12:41 am

    Everything you wear should not show your knees, shoulders, or chest. This especially applies to the women. Wearing capri pants is acceptable and short sleeves are fine. Since Qatar is an Islamic country, the people tend to dress more conservatively than in America. Wearing shorts or a tank top will draw unwanted attention to you and that’s not something anyone wants. The men should wear longer cargo shorts that at least reach the knees. Also, wearing clothing that screams “I’M AMERICAN!” probably isn’t the wisest idea. Qatar is very modern and incredibly secure, but it’s better to be safe than sorry. As always, be sure to do your own research about the country you’ll be visiting or studying in, as the clothing expectation differs among countries. It is important to respect the local traditions and customs. Hopefully these tips have provided a bit of insight into the culture in Qatar and have better prepared you for a visit to this region! Although Qatar clothing has changed over the years, Qataris are proud of their clothing, and traditional clothes are worn with pride on daily basis. Qatar is an Islamic country, and people dress in a very traditional manner. Although there is no dress code as such, for foreigners, it is better to wear modest clothes, and conservative clothing is recommended. This implies no shorts for men, and no mini-skirts or tank tops for women. Foreign visitors are expected to dress in a style that is sensitive to Islamic culture.

  35. Ashton
    April 21, 2013 at 1:03 am

    Facts About Qatar,
    There population of Qatar is 534,000! That is a lot of people on my opinion. The sqare km of Qatar is 11,500 sq km! The economy of Qatar is dominated by oil and nature gas, which acounts 70% of export income. Oil and gas revenues has been used to diversify there economy, including the development of chemicals, steel, cement, fertilizer, industries and banking.
    History About Qatar,
    Qatar was ruled by Bahrain from the 1700s until the-1800s. When great Britain and the ottopan Empier began vying for control of the Peninsual. It was a British protectorate from 1916 until 1971, when it became independent on the 1980s and 90s. Qatar had a territorial disputes with Bahrain and sandi Arabia. These disputes were not completely setteled until 2001.

    Thank you for listtening! 🙂

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